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Greek Bronze Bactria Caduceus and Elephant (073)

Sale price$1,220.00
Description

Large ancient Greek bronze coin with an image of a caduceus on one side and a trumpeting elephant wearing a bell on the other side. 

Dated: 200-185 BC 

One of a kind with Certificate of Authenticity.

Chain is sold separately.  See Chains

Size and Material

30mm in a hand-fabricated sterling silver and 18kt recycled gold mount with an 18kt gold enhancer bail.

Story

Demetrios I of Bactria was never defeated in battle and was known as the second Alexander.  

The rejoicing elephant, depicted on the front of the coin is surrounded by the royal bead-and-reel decoration. The elephant, one of the symbols of Buddhism and the Gautama Buddha, possibly represents the victory of Buddhism brought about by Demetrios. The coin's reverse depicts the caduceus, a symbol of reconciliation between two fighting serpents, which is likely a representation of peace between the Greeks and the Sungas, and likewise between Buddhism and Brahmanism. It might also symbolize Asklepios, the Greek deity of medicine.  (hellenicaworld.com)
Description

Large ancient Greek bronze coin with an image of a caduceus on one side and a trumpeting elephant wearing a bell on the other side. 

Dated: 200-185 BC 

One of a kind with Certificate of Authenticity.

Chain is sold separately.  See Chains

Size and Material

30mm in a hand-fabricated sterling silver and 18kt recycled gold mount with an 18kt gold enhancer bail.

Story

Demetrios I of Bactria was never defeated in battle and was known as the second Alexander.  

The rejoicing elephant, depicted on the front of the coin is surrounded by the royal bead-and-reel decoration. The elephant, one of the symbols of Buddhism and the Gautama Buddha, possibly represents the victory of Buddhism brought about by Demetrios. The coin's reverse depicts the caduceus, a symbol of reconciliation between two fighting serpents, which is likely a representation of peace between the Greeks and the Sungas, and likewise between Buddhism and Brahmanism. It might also symbolize Asklepios, the Greek deity of medicine.  (hellenicaworld.com)