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Celtic Danube Silver Coin Zeus circa 200 BC (090)

Sale price$4,360.00
Description

Ancient silver coin in the stylized type of the Danubian Celtic peoples.  Zeus is wonderfully detailed, from his braided hair to the laurel detail around the coin.  

One of a kind with Certificate of Authenticity.

Size and Materials

13mm 18kt gold ring with accent diamonds

Size 7.  (can be resized)

Story

Dated: circa 200 BC

We associate Celtic culture with Ireland and Great Britain. But in ancient times the Celts ranged from Spain to the Danube and as far south-east as modern Syria. The Danubian, Kugelwange, type Celtic coin comes from the area covered by many countries, including parts of Hungary, Slovakia, Austria, Croatia and Slovenia.
The Celts adopted Greek coinage as a means for making payments and accumulating wealth.
What is distinctive about the Celtic coinage is that it quickly became abstract.  The most common ancient Celtic coins are copies of the Phillip II tetra-drachm.  The horse and rider from the Phillip II coin lost the rider and the horse became more like a disjointed puppet. The image of Hercules on the back of the coin also became more abstract with the hair and lion skin becoming patterns of dots and lines.
Description

Ancient silver coin in the stylized type of the Danubian Celtic peoples.  Zeus is wonderfully detailed, from his braided hair to the laurel detail around the coin.  

One of a kind with Certificate of Authenticity.

Size and Materials

13mm 18kt gold ring with accent diamonds

Size 7.  (can be resized)

Story

Dated: circa 200 BC

We associate Celtic culture with Ireland and Great Britain. But in ancient times the Celts ranged from Spain to the Danube and as far south-east as modern Syria. The Danubian, Kugelwange, type Celtic coin comes from the area covered by many countries, including parts of Hungary, Slovakia, Austria, Croatia and Slovenia.
The Celts adopted Greek coinage as a means for making payments and accumulating wealth.
What is distinctive about the Celtic coinage is that it quickly became abstract.  The most common ancient Celtic coins are copies of the Phillip II tetra-drachm.  The horse and rider from the Phillip II coin lost the rider and the horse became more like a disjointed puppet. The image of Hercules on the back of the coin also became more abstract with the hair and lion skin becoming patterns of dots and lines.